Mobile Site ›

Test ID: PTH2P
Parathyroid Hormone (PTH), with Minerals, Serum

Back to Pediatric Index | Back to list | More information

Secondary ID A test code used for billing and in test definitions created prior to November 2011

28380

Reference Values Describes reference intervals and additional information for interpretation of test results. May include intervals based on age and sex when appropriate. Intervals are Mayo-derived, unless otherwise designated. If an interpretive report is provided, the reference value field will state this.

PTH

15-65 pg/mL

Reference values apply to all ages.

 

CALCIUM

Males

0-11 months: not established*

1-14 years: 9.6-10.6 mg/dL

15-16 years: 9.5-10.5 mg/dL

17-18 years: 9.5-10.4 mg/dL

19-21 years: 9.3-10.3 mg/dL

> or =22 years: 8.9-10.1 mg/dL

Females

0-11 months: not established*

1-11 years: 9.6-10.6 mg/dL

12-14 years: 9.5-10.4 mg/dL

15-18 years: 9.1-10.3 mg/dL

> or =19 years: 8.9-10.1 mg/dL

 

PHOSPHORUS

Males

0-11 months: not established**

1-4 years: 4.3-5.4 mg/dL

5-13 years: 3.7-5.4 mg/dL

14-15 years: 3.5-5.3 mg/dL

16-17 years: 3.1-4.7 mg/dL

> or =18 years: 2.5-4.5 mg/dL

Females

0-11 months: not established**

1-7 years: 4.3-5.4 mg/dL

8-13 years: 4.0-5.2 mg/dL

14-15 years: 3.5-4.9 mg/dL

16-17 years: 3.1-4.7 mg/dL

> or =18 years: 2.5-4.5 mg/dL

 

CREATININE

Males

0-11 months: not established

1-2 years: 0.1-0.4 mg/dL

3-4 years: 0.1-0.5 mg/dL

5-9 years: 0.2-0.6 mg/dL

10-11 years: 0.3-0.7 mg/dL

12-13 years: 0.4-0.8 mg/dL

14-15 years: 0.5-0.9 mg/dL

> or =16 years: 0.8-1.3 mg/dL

Females

0-11 months: not established

1-3 years: 0.1-0.4 mg/dL

4-5 years: 0.2-0.5 mg/dL

6-8 years: 0.3-0.6 mg/dL

9-15 years: 0.4-0.7 mg/dL

> or =16 years: 0.6-1.1 mg/dL

 

*The serum concentration of calcium varies significantly during the immediate neonatal period. In general, the serum calcium concentration decreases over the first days of life, followed by a gradual increase to adult concentrations by the second or third week of life.

**The plasma concentrations of inorganic phosphate in the neonatal period can be greater than those of the adult.



Key