Mobile Site ›
Print Friendly View

Test ID: ALAUR    
Aminolevulinic Acid (ALA), Urine

‹ Back to Pediatric index

Useful For Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Assistance in the differential diagnosis of the various acute hepatic porphyrias

Clinical Information Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical aspects, as they relate to a laboratory test

The porphyrias are a group of inherited disorders resulting from enzyme defects in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Depending on the specific enzyme involved, various porphyrins and their precursors accumulate in different specimen types. The patterns of porphyrin accumulation in erythrocytes and plasma and excretion of the heme precursors in urine and feces allow for the detection and differentiation of the porphyrias.

 

The porphyrias are typically classified as erythropoietic or hepatic based upon the primary site of the enzyme defect. In addition, hepatic porphyrias can be further classified as chronic or acute, based on their clinical presentation.

 

The primary acute hepatic porphyrias: aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria (ADP), acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), hereditary coproporphyria (HCP), and variegate porphyria (VP), are associated with neurovisceral symptoms which typically onset during puberty or later. Common symptoms include severe abdominal pain, peripheral neuropathy, and psychiatric symptoms. A broad range of medications (including barbiturates and sulfa drugs), alcohol, infection, starvation, heavy metals, and hormonal changes may precipitate crises. Photosensitivity is not associated with AIP, but may be present in HCP and VP.

 

The excretion of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) can be increased due to one of the inherited acute porphyrias or due to secondary inhibition of ALA dehydratase. Among the secondary causes, acute lead intoxication results in the highest degree of aminolevulinic aciduria. Less significant elevations are seen in chronic lead intoxication, tyrosinemia type I, alcoholism, and pregnancy.

 

The work up of patients with a suspected porphyria is most effective when following a stepwise approach. See Porphyria (Acute) Testing Algorithm and Porphyria (Cutaneous) Testing Algorithm in Special Instructions or contact Mayo Medical Laboratories to discuss testing strategies.

Reference Values Describes reference intervals and additional information for interpretation of test results. May include intervals based on age and sex when appropriate. Intervals are Mayo-derived, unless otherwise designated. If an interpretive report is provided, the reference value field will state this.

<1 year: < or =10 nmol/mL

1-17 years: < or =20 nmol/mL

> or =18 years: < or =15 nmol/mL

Interpretation Provides information to assist in interpretation of the test results

Abnormal results are reported with a detailed interpretation which may include an overview of the results and their significance, a correlation to available clinical information provided with the specimen, differential diagnosis, recommendations for additional testing when indicated and available, and a phone number to reach one of the laboratory directors in case the referring physician has additional questions.

Cautions Discusses conditions that may cause diagnostic confusion, including improper specimen collection and handling, inappropriate test selection, and interfering substances

The preferred test for lead toxicity in children is blood lead (see PBBD / Lead with Demographics, Blood).

Clinical Reference Provides recommendations for further in-depth reading of a clinical nature

1. Tortorelli S, Kloke K, Raymond K: Chapter 15: Disorders of porphyrin metabolism. In Biochemical and Molecular Basis of Pediatric Disease. Fourth edition. Edited by DJ Dietzen, MJ Bennett, ECC Wong. AACC Press, 2010, pp 307-324

2. Meyer UA, Schuurmans MM, Lindberg RL: Acute porphyrias: pathogenesis of neurological manifestations. Semin Liver Dis 1998;18:43-52

3. Warren MJ, Cooper JB, Wood SP, Shoolingin-Jordan PM: Lead poisoning, haem synthesis and 5-aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase. Trends Biochem Sci 1998;23:217-221

4. Anderson KE, Sassa S, Bishop DF, et al: Disorders of heme biosynthesis: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and the porphyrias. In The Metabolic Basis of Inherited Disease. Eighth edition. Edited by CR Scriver, AL Beaudet, WS Sly, et al. New York, McGraw-Hill Medical Publishing Division, 2001, pp 2991-3062

5. Nuttall KL, Klee GG: Analytes of hemoglobin metabolism-porphyrins, iron, and bilirubin. In Tietz Textbook of Clinical Chemistry. Fifth edition. Edited by CA Burtis, ER Ashwood. Philadelphia, WB Saunders Company, 2001, pp 584-607

Special Instructions and Forms Describes specimen collection and preparation information, test algorithms, and other information pertinent to test. Also includes pertinent information and consent forms to be used when requesting a particular test