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Test ID: MMAS    
Methylmalonic Acid (MMA), Quantitative, Serum

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Useful For Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Evaluating children with signs and symptoms of methylmalonic acidemia

 

Additional confirmatory testing must be performed.

 

Evaluating individuals with signs and symptoms associated with a variety of causes of cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency

 

Several studies have suggested that the determination of serum or urinary methylmalonic acid could be a more reliable marker of cobalamin deficiency than direct cobalamin determination.

Clinical Information Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical aspects, as they relate to a laboratory test

The concentration of serum methylmalonic acid (MMA) is elevated primarily in patients affected with methylmalonic acidemia and patients with a nutritional deficiency of cobalamin (vitamin B12) or folic acid. Of the 2, nutritional deficiencies are much more common and can be due to intestinal malabsorption, impaired digestion, or poor diet. Elderly patients with cobalamin deficiency may present with peripheral neuropathy, ataxia, loss of position and vibration senses, memory impairment, depression, and dementia in the absence of anemia. Other conditions such as renal insufficiency, hypovolemia, and bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine also contribute to the possible causes of mild methylmalonic acidemia and aciduria.

 

MMA is also a specific diagnostic marker for the group of disorders collectively called methylmalonic acidemia, which include at least 7 different complementation groups. Two of them (mut0 and mut-) reflect deficiencies of the apoenzyme portion of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. Two other disorders (CblA and CblB) are associated with abnormalities of the adenosylcobalamin synthesis pathway. CblC, CblD, and CblF deficiencies lead to impaired synthesis of both adenosyl- and methylcobalamin.

 

Since the first reports of this disorder in 1967, many hundreds of cases have been diagnosed worldwide. Newborn screening identifies approximately 1 in 30,000 live births with a methylmalonic acidemia. The most frequent clinical manifestations are neonatal or infantile metabolic ketoacidosis, failure to thrive, and developmental delay. Excessive protein intake may cause life-threatening episodes of metabolic decompensation and remains a life-long risk unless treatment is closely monitored, including serum and urine MMA levels.

Reference Values Describes reference intervals and additional information for interpretation of test results. May include intervals based on age and sex when appropriate. Intervals are Mayo-derived, unless otherwise designated. If an interpretive report is provided, the reference value field will state this.

< or =0.40 nmol/mL

Interpretation Provides information to assist in interpretation of the test results

In pediatric patients, markedly elevated methylmalonic acid values indicate a probable diagnosis of methylmalonic acidemia. Additional confirmatory testing must be performed.

 

In adults, moderately elevated values indicate a likely cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency.

Cautions Discusses conditions that may cause diagnostic confusion, including improper specimen collection and handling, inappropriate test selection, and interfering substances

Diet, nutritional status, and age should be considered in the evaluation of serum or urine methylmalonic acid level.

Clinical Reference Provides recommendations for further in-depth reading of a clinical nature

1. Fenton WA, Gravel RA, Rosenblatt DS: Disorders of propionate and methylmalonate metabolism. In The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease. In Scriver's The Online Metabolic and Molecular Basis of Inherited Disease (OMBBID). Edited by D Valle, A Beaudet, B Vogelstein, et al. McGraw-Hill. Chapter 94. Retrieved 2010

2. Klee GG: Cobalamin and folate evaluation measurement of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine vs vitamin B12 and folate. Clin Chem 2000:46(8):1277-1283

3. Hussein L, Abdel A, Tapouzada S, Boehles H: Serum vitamin B12 concentrations among mothers and newborns and follow-up study to assess implication on the growth velocity and the urinary methylmalonic acid excretion. Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2009 Sep:79(5-6):297-307