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Interpretive Handbook

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Test 81183 :
Familial Hypercholesterolemia, LDLR Gene, Known Mutation

Clinical Information Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical aspects, as they relate to a laboratory test

Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disorder that is characterized by high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and associated with premature cardiovascular disease and myocardial infarction. FH is caused by mutations in the LDLR gene, which encodes for the LDL receptor. LDLR mutations impair the ability of the LDL receptor to remove LDL cholesterol from plasma via receptor-mediated endocytosis, leading to elevated levels of plasma LDL cholesterol and subsequent deposition in the skin and tendons (xanthomas) and arteries (atheromas).

 

FH can occur in either the heterozygous or homozygous state, with 1 or 2 mutant LDLR alleles, respectively. In general, FH heterozygotes have 2-fold elevations in plasma cholesterol and develop coronary atherosclerosis after the age of 30. Homozygous FH individuals have severe hypercholesterolemia (>650 mg/dL) with the presence of cutaneous xanthomas prior to 4 years of age, childhood coronary heart disease, and death from myocardial infarction prior to 20 years of age. Heterozygous FH is prevalent among many different populations, with an approximate average worldwide incidence of 1 in 500 individuals, but as high as 1 in 67 to 1 in 100 individuals in some South African populations and 1 in 270 in the French Canadian population. Homozygous FH occurs at frequency of approximately 1 in 1,000,000.

 

Treatment is aimed at lowering plasma LDL levels and increasing LDL receptor activity. Identification of LDLR mutation(s) in individuals suspected of having FH helps to determine appropriate treatment. FH heterozygotes are often treated with 3-hyroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (ie, statins), either in monotherapy or in combination with other drugs such as nicotinic acid and inhibitors of intestinal cholesterol absorption. Such drugs are generally not effective in FH homozygotes; treatment in these individuals may consist of LDL apheresis, portacaval anastomosis, and liver transplantation.

 

The LDLR gene maps to chromosome 19p13 and consists of 18 exons spanning 45 kb. Hundreds of mutations have been identified in the LDLR gene, the majority of them occurring in the ligand binding and epidermal growth factor (EGF) precursor homology regions in the 5' region of the gene (type II and III mutations, respectively). The majority of LDLR mutations are missense, small insertion, deletion, and other point mutations, most of which are detected by full-gene sequencing. Approximately 10% to 15% of LDLR mutations are large rearrangements, such as exonic deletions and duplications, which cannot be detected by full-gene sequencing.

Useful For Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Genetic testing of individuals at risk for known LDLR familial mutation

Interpretation Provides information to assist in interpretation of the test results

An interpretive report will be provided.

Cautions Discusses conditions that may cause diagnostic confusion, including improper specimen collection and handling, inappropriate test selection, and interfering substances

Patients who have received a heterologous blood transfusion within the preceding 6 weeks, or who have received an allogeneic blood or marrow transplant, can have inaccurate genetic test results due to presence of donor DNA.

 

Any error in the diagnosis or in the pedigree provided to us, including false-paternity, could lead to erroneous interpretation of results.

 

Rare polymorphisms exist that could lead to false-negative or false-positive results. If results obtained do not match the clinical findings, additional testing should be considered.

Reference Values Describes reference intervals and additional information for interpretation of test results. May include intervals based on age and sex when appropriate. Intervals are Mayo-derived, unless otherwise designated. If an interpretive report is provided, the reference value field will state this.

An interpretive report will be provided.

Clinical References Provides recommendations for further in-depth reading of a clinical nature

1. Hobbs H, Brown MS, Goldstein JL: Molecular genetics of the LDL receptor gene in familial hypercholesterolemia. Hum Mutat 1992;1:445-466

2. Goldstein JL, Hobbs H, Brown MS: Familial hypercholesterolemia. In The Metabolic Basis of Inherited Disease. Edited by CR Scriver, AL Beaudet, D Valle, WS Sly. New York, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 2006, pp 2863-2913

3. van Aalst-Cohen ES, Jansen AC, Tanck MW, et al: Diagnosing familial hypercholesterolaemia: the relevance of genetic testing. Eur Heart J 2006;27:2440-2446


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